Home / A Conversation About Developing and Implementing Individualized Interventions for Children who have Experienced Trauma

A Conversation About Developing and Implementing Individualized Interventions for Children who have Experienced Trauma

Join us for another conversation dedicated to implementing the individualized intensive intervention process while honoring the unique experiences of children who have experienced trauma. We will build on the March 2023 webinar to discuss the approaches teams might use as they engage in functional behavior assessment, plan development, and plan implementation to support a child who has experienced trauma.

Date:

Nov 13, 2023

Time:

3:00 PM

Duration:

1 hr

Certificate Info

Certificate of Attendance

A downloadable certificate is available for both live and recorded webinars. To receive the certificate, you must fill out the evaluation survey.

How to access the survey:

Live participants: You will receive an email after the webinar with the link to the survey. Recording viewers: The URL link for the survey will be displayed at the end of the webinar. You will need to type that URL into your internet browser to access the survey and certificate. Note: Type the URL exactly as you see it. URL is CASE SENSITIVE. Once you submit the survey, the certificate will appear. You can then save and/or print your certificate.

NCPMI Presenter(s)

Lise Fox

University of South Florida

Lise Fox, PhD, is a Professor and Chair in the Department of Child and Family Studies in the College of Behavioral and Community Sciences of the University of South Florida. She is the Principal Investigator of the National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations, a faculty member with the ECTA Center, and is involved in multiple research and national technical assistance projects related to early childhood programs and practices.  Her research is focused on practical approaches for the inclusion of young children with problem behavior in community settings and individualized interventions for addressing young children’s challenging behavior.

Jaclyn Joseph

University of Denver

Dr. Jackie Joseph is a Research Associate Professor at the University of Denver Positive Early Learning Experiences Center, where her work promotes high-quality inclusion across all levels of the early childhood care and education system. She specifically focuses on family partnerships and evidence-based strategies for fostering each and every young child’s social, emotional, and behavioral development. Jackie’s experience working in child care administration offers her an applied understanding of implementing and scaling inclusive practices and models, and particularly the Pyramid and LEAP Models.  Dr. Joseph has two young children herself, one of whom has a rare genetic syndrome. Her anti-ableist research and work are strongly influenced by her family’s experiences and center around diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging. In all of her projects, Jackie strives to co-create opportunities and spaces that ensure that all young children, disabled and nondisabled, and their families experience meaningful inclusion and belonging.

Julia Sayles

Georgetown University

Julia Sayles is a Licensed Mental Health Clinician (LMHC) who has spent the last decade serving early childhood populations through direct clinical work, training and technical assistance, and product development.  Julia is a research instructor at Georgetown University where she supports infant and early childhood systems of care work as well as training and technical assistance for the Head Start Center on Health, Behavioral Health, and Safety. Julia is also a member of the pyramid model master cadre for Massachusetts where she supports Pyramid Model implementation across a variety of settings.



Guest Presenter(s)

Blair Lloyd

Vanderbilt University

Blair Lloyd, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Her research focuses on functional behavior assessment and intervention for children with behavioral challenges in schools, with a growing emphasis on the intersection of behavior analysis and mental health. She serves as Co-Principal Investigator for the Tennessee Tiered Supports Center. Dr. Lloyd teaches courses in single case design, observational methods, and experimental analysis of behavior. She works closely with masters and doctoral students in her research and teaching roles.

Charis Wahman

Michigan State University

Charis Lauren Wahman, PhD, BCBA-D is an assistant professor of special education at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on training early childhood teachers on evidence-based practices within the framework of Positive Behavior Supports (PBS) to stop suspension and expulsion of preschool children. She also examines the experiences of families whose children have significant social and emotional needs. Her research aims to understand the contextual factors that hinder or enhance a child's social and emotional development while improving the quality of school-based intervention services for young children and the relationship between schools and families. Her empirical and practitioner-oriented work has been published in journals such as Remedial and Special Education, Children and Youth Services Review, Education and Treatment of Children, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, Psychology in the Schools, Early Childhood Education Journal, Young Children and Young and Exceptional Children.

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