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Temperament Continuum

Temperament Continuum Handout Thumbnail

This form can be used by providers to help understand where children in their care fall on the temperament continuum.

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Toddlers (Spanish, PDF)

Toddlers experience big emotions as they learn to make meaning of their world and communicate their needs. Toddlers look to their primary caregivers to let them what they are experiencing is okay. Caregivers can use the strategies included in this infographic to provide toddlers with predictability in their day, safety in relationships, meaning to their … Read more

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Toddlers (Somali, PDF)

Toddlers experience big emotions as they learn to make meaning of their world and communicate their needs. Toddlers look to their primary caregivers to let them what they are experiencing is okay. Caregivers can use the strategies included in this infographic to provide toddlers with predictability in their day, safety in relationships, meaning to their … Read more

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Toddlers (Hmong, PDF)

Thumbnail image of the infographic, Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm - Toddlers (Hmong, PDF)

Toddlers experience big emotions as they learn to make meaning of their world and communicate their needs. Toddlers look to their primary caregivers to let them what they are experiencing is okay. Caregivers can use the strategies included in this infographic to provide toddlers with predictability in their day, safety in relationships, meaning to their … Read more

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Infants (Image)

Caregivers can use the strategies in the infographic to provide infants with predictability in their day, and safety in relationships- all to support healthy attachment. Infants rely on the adults in their lives to read their cues, and help them to regulate as they adapt to their world. Responsive and positive interactions between infants and … Read more

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Infants (PDF)

Caregivers can use the strategies in the infographic to provide infants with predictability in their day, and safety in relationships- all to support healthy attachment. Infants rely on the adults in their lives to read their cues, and help them to regulate as they adapt to their world. Responsive and positive interactions between infants and … Read more

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Toddlers (Image)

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm - Toddlers

Toddlers experience big emotions as they learn to make meaning of their world and communicate their needs. Toddlers look to their primary caregivers to let them what they are experiencing is okay. Caregivers can use the strategies included in this infographic to provide toddlers with predictability in their day, safety in relationships, meaning to their … Read more

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm – Toddlers (PDF)

Things That Will Help Me Stay Calm - Toddlers

Toddlers experience big emotions as they learn to make meaning of their world and communicate their needs. Toddlers look to their primary caregivers to let them what they are experiencing is okay. Caregivers can use the strategies included in this infographic to provide toddlers with predictability in their day, safety in relationships, meaning to their experiences and emotions, and begin to build their problem-solving skills.

Help Us Stay Calm: Strategies that help you and your child during challenging behavior (Somali, Image)

Help Us Stay Calm Infographic (Somali) thumb

When a child is engaged in challenging behavior or experiencing anger, stress, sadness or frustration, it is important to stay calm. The strategies in this infographic help both caregiver and child stay calm during challenging behavior. Early care and education and family support programs are encouraged to download the infographic to use in their social media to families or repost on their web site.

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